Loading Events

Past Events

Events Search and Views Navigation

Event Views Navigation

May 2021

Agustín Fuentes – Meaning-making, belief and world shaping as core processes in the human niche

Meaning-making, belief and world shaping as core processes in the human niche Agustín Fuentes Department of Anthropology, Princeton University Humans are not unique in the world. But we are quite idiosyncratic. Across the Pleistocene the genus Homo developed a distinctive suite of cognitive, behavioral, ecological, and technological processes and patterns; in short, a human niche. This niche eventually included a core role for meaning making, augmenting the capacity to engage with more than the “here and now” to develop novel…

Find out more »
May 10 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Kim TallBear – Indigenous STS, Governance, and Decolonization

Indigenous STS, Governance, and Decolonization Kim TallBear Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment Pierre Elliot Trudeau Foundation Fellow Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta Like traditional Science and Technology Studies, the new field of Indigenous STS studies the cultures, politics, and histories of non-Indigenous science and technology efforts. In addition, it studies Indigenous-led science and technology, including knowledges classified as “traditional.” Indigenous STS refuses the purported divide between scientific and Indigenous knowledges, yet it does not…

Find out more »
May 13 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Isabelle Laumer – Physical and social cognition in a parrot (Cacatua goffiniana) and ape model species (Pongo abelii)

Physical and social cognition in a parrot (Cacatua goffiniana) and ape model species (Pongo abelii) Isabelle Laumer Department of Anthropology, UCLA The comparative approach is a powerful tool to deepen our understanding of the adaptive value of complex information processing. Modern approaches of comparative cognition are interested in how cognitive outputs are influenced on the basis of convergence (distantly related species facing similar demands) or on the basis of divergence (closely related species facing different cognitive challenges). Birds diverged from…

Find out more »
May 17 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Chris Krupenye – The social minds of humans and other apes

The social minds of humans and other apes Chris Krupenye Department of Psychology, Durham University and Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Few traits characterise humans more profoundly than the complexity of our social lives, and the depth of our insights into the social and mental lives of others. To predict behaviour and make decisions in a dynamic and uncertain social world, we track others’ social relationships, evaluate others based on their behaviour or identity, and even…

Find out more »
May 19 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Alyssa Crittenden – Microbiomania, rewilding, and the threat of bioprospecting: How anthropologists can help to set a more ethical research agenda in microbiome sciences

Microbiomania, rewilding, and the threat of bioprospecting: How anthropologists can help to set a more ethical research agenda in microbiome sciences Alyssa N. Crittenden Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Scientific knowledge and commercial interest in the human microbiome are growing exponentially. As our understanding of the vital role of microbes increases, so does “microbiomania” – the fervor in which microbes are lauded in popular media and scientific press as capable of revolutionizing human health in the Global…

Find out more »
May 24 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

September 2021

Herman Pontzer – Evolution, Activity, and Aging in Human Energy Expenditure

Evolution, Activity, and Aging in Human Energy Expenditure Herman Pontzer Duke University Metabolic energy expenditure, the combined activity of our 37 trillion cells, and shapes our daily energy requirements and affects our health. Conventional wisdom, born largely from clinical studies in industrialized populations, has held that daily energy expenditures are similar for closely related species, increase at a constant rate with body size through growth and development, and are strongly affected by physical activity levels. Recent work, including research with…

Find out more »
September 27 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

October 2021

James Holland Jones — Cultural Evolutionary Dynamics Under Structural Uncertainty and the Consequences for Coupled Diffusion Processes

Cultural Evolutionary Dynamics Under Structural Uncertainty and the Consequences for Coupled Diffusion Processes James Holland Jones Earth Systems Science, Stanford University The COVID-19 Pandemic has laid bare the social vulnerabilities that make epidemics larger, more deadly, and more difficult to control, both within the US and internationally. Differential vulnerability by social attributes (e.g., race, socioeconomic status, gender) leaves the overall population at greater risk for severe outbreaks than would be the case in less unequal populations. While health researchers have…

Find out more »
October 4 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Damian Caillaud – Behavioral ecology: an important tool to protect threatened gorilla populations

Behavioral ecology: an important tool to protect threatened gorilla populations. Damian Caillaud, UC Davis Conservation measures are often based on survey data and demographic projections, rather than behavior ecology studies. However, animal behavior research often provides key information explaining why some populations are threatened with extinction. For example, aspects of the ranging behavior and social structure of mountain gorillas strongly reduce population growth, even in the absence of feeding competition. In other studies, we found that home range persistence hinders…

Find out more »
October 11 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Idan Blank – The relationship between language and executive functions

Idan Blank UCLA Department of Psychology Two cognitive capacities that “make us human” are our ability to communicate via language and our executive functions (working memory, cognitive control, inhibition, etc.), both unparalleled in the animal kingdom. Language comprehension is mainly carried out by specialized mechanisms that are language-specific and are not engaged in other high-level cognitive functions; in contrast, executive functions constitute a general resource that is shared across diverse cognitive domains. Are these two capacities related to one another?…

Find out more »
October 18 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Sarah Hill – Cytokines as a mediator of condition-dependent behavioral strategies

Sarah E. Hill Department of Psychology, Texas Christian University A growing body of research finds that the activities of the immune system – in addition to protecting the body from infection and injury – also influence how we think, feel, and behave. Although research on the relationship between the immune system and psychological and behavioral outcomes has most commonly focused on the experiences of those who are acutely ill (i.e., sickness behavior), theory and research in the evolutionary sciences suggests…

Find out more »
October 25 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
+ Export Events